hilarious —

(Source: zizicat, via unwinona)

angryseawitch:

riseofthecommonwoodpile:

it’s amazing to me that Amanda Palmer, out of everything in 12 Years A Slave, somehow zeroed in on a nonexistent theme of oppressors being vital to helping the oppressed overcome oppression. How do you watch that movie and pick up that? I know I shouldn’t be surprised but I am still PRETTY SURPRISED that someone can be so indebted to their own weird pseudo-caring liberal idea of social justice as to see THAT in 12 Years A Slave. That is some serious self-centered privilege, like impressively so.

"12 years a slave made me think about how mean everyone is to macklemore"

Honestly, she isn’t the only white person to pick up that theme of white male hero. See James Franco’s hot mess of a review here: http://www.nola.com/opinions/index.ssf/2013/11/james_francos_review_of_12_yea.html)  As powerful as “12 years” was to some, it still what bell hooks calls “Typical Hollywood sentimental claptrap.”

These sorts of slave movies always allow an “out” for the “good white folks” to restore order. In that way, white American can watch with some of their guilt assuage. “I would have been he good white guy character!!” they all can think.   

(Source: gowns, via wordsandturds)

"

It was definitely a choice. It was the very first conversation after Disney bought the show. I had felt strongly about making sure that Doc was female, and a lot of people said, “Well, you created the show for your son, why is it a female lead character?” And I just thought that nobody needs another male doctor or another male leader in a group. What we needed was a female character. And Disney, in the first conversation that we had after they bought the pitch said, “We’ve been looking for a good character to bring some ethnicity into them, how do you feel if she’s African-American?” I said, “Fantastic!”

For me, I am always looking for ways to shine a light on people who don’t get to see themselves represented on TV. I think it’s one of the most powerful things we have in working in especially preschool television. Unfortunately–like everyone else–we really lag in our representation of people who are in the mainstream. It just seemed like a great choice. And that was it. It was probably just a two minute conversation at the beginning. I look at the amount of positive impact that that one decision has made, and I think about how easy it was.

I encourage anyone else to make the same decision. It’s so powerful to show representation of somebody who’s not usually on TV.

"

-Chris Nee, creator of Disney’s ‘Doc McStuffins’ on making the character African-American

More: http://www.msnbc.com/melissa-harris-perry/meet-chris-nee-creator-disneys-doc

(via diasporadash)

And she’s adorable

(via ecr5068)

(Source: diasporadash, via ecr5068)

"

The failure of black folks and people of color to remain collectively vigilant about the way we are represented in mass media has resulted in collusion with white supremacy.

Since the vast majority of images depicted reinforce either conventional stereotypes or the notion that particularly with black folks, we’re only good when we’re serving the interests of white folks- whether as mammy, maid, prostitute, or as the ‘good sidekick.’ When there are radically new images that challenge conventional stereotypes they tend to be so rare, they do not successfully intervene on the racist status quo.

"

— bell hooks, “Lecture at Texas A&M” (via blackinasia)

(Source: owning-my-truth)

babytiga:

okay Im gonna need folks to understand

  1. AAVE stands for African American Vernacular English
  2. AAVE is a language with structures and rules just like any other language
  3. use of AAVE is not “ghetto” and does not make a person unintelligent for using it
  4. that mocking it because it neglects your idea of “civilized speech” is pretty much anti black and makes you an asshole
  5. and it can be appropriated

simple to understand yes?

(via riseabovethemadness)

poe-ettic:

ankhnation:

Handshake with a white guy…LOLS! 

He is watching the other handshakes and he is lookin like, “ok so how does that one go. Do I just - … oh I get the normal one. Good.”

lmao!!

poe-ettic:

ankhnation:

Handshake with a white guy…LOLS! 

He is watching the other handshakes and he is lookin like, “ok so how does that one go. Do I just - … oh I get the normal one. Good.”

lmao!!

(via windowsintheattic)

ladylazyjay:

kittykate666:

Guys

oh goodness Obama AND Idris…my heart

The President in a bow tie…..oooooh! LOL 

ladylazyjay:

kittykate666:

Guys

oh goodness Obama AND Idris…my heart

The President in a bow tie…..oooooh! LOL 

(Source: 69kittykate69)

magnacarterholygrail:

blackgirlsrpretty2:

I don’t know what most white people in this country feel but I can only include what they feel from the state of their institutions. James Baldwin on The Dick Cavett Show [X]

^^^^!!!!!!!!

I will reblog this every single time it crosses my dash without fail because this is at the heart of basically any discussion about racism that I will ever have.

chocolatecakesandthickmilkshakes:

tygmaker:

1800ringgold:

I will reblog this until the stars burn out……

white people are very brave when it comes to terrorizing black children who do not have the power to fight back. and are very surprise when someone comes to their defense.

I will reblog until I die.

chocolatecakesandthickmilkshakes:

tygmaker:

1800ringgold:

I will reblog this until the stars burn out……

white people are very brave when it comes to terrorizing black children who do not have the power to fight back. and are very surprise when someone comes to their defense.

I will reblog until I die.

(Source: phattygirls, via owning-my-truth)

me and a friend on Twitter clowning it tho…

reverseracism:

Can I just laugh at both choices?

"

If you’re a boy writer, it’s a simple rule: you’ve gotta get used to the fact that you suck at writing women and that the worst women writer can write a better man than the best male writer can write a good woman. And it’s just the minimum. Because the thing about the sort of heteronormative masculine privilege, whether it’s in Santo Domingo, or the United States, is you grow up your entire life being told that women aren’t human beings, and that women have no independent subjectivity. And because you grow up with this, it’s this huge surprise when you go to college and realize that, “Oh, women aren’t people who does my shit and fucks me.”

And I think that this a huge challenge for boys, because they want to pretend they can write girls. Every time I’m teaching boys to write, I read their women to them, and I’m like, “Yo, you think this is good writing?” These motherfuckers attack each other over cliche lines but they won’t attack each other over these toxic representations of women that they have inherited… their sexist shorthand, they think that is observation. They think that their sexist distortions are insight. And if you’re in a writing program and you say to a guy that their characters are sexist, this guy, it’s like you said they fucking love Hitler. They will fight tooth and nail because they want to preserve this really vicious sexism in the art because that is what they have been taught.

And I think the first step is to admit that you, because of your privilege, have a very distorted sense of women’s subjectivity. And without an enormous amount of assistance, you’re not even going to get a D. I think with male writers the most that you can hope for is a D with an occasional C thrown in. Where the average women writer, when she writes men, she gets a B right off the bat, because they spent their whole life being taught that men have a subjectivity. In fact, part of the whole feminism revolution was saying, “Me too, motherfuckers.” So women come with it built in because of the society.

It’s the same way when people write about race. If you didn’t grow up being a subaltern person in the United States, you might need help writing about race. Motherfuckers are like ‘I got a black boy friend,’ and their shit sounds like Klan Fiction 101.

The most toxic formulas in our cultures are not pass down in political practice, they’re pass down in mundane narratives. It’s our fiction where the toxic virus of sexism, racism, homophobia, where it passes from one generation to the next, and the average artist will kill you before they remove those poisons. And if you want to be a good artist, it means writing, really, about the world. And when you write cliches, whether they are sexist, racist, homophobic, classist, that is a fucking cliche. And motherfuckers will kill you for their cliches about x, but they want their cliches about their race, class, queerness. They want it in there because they feel lost without it. So for me, this has always been the great challenge.

As a writer, if you’re really trying to write something new, you must figure out, with the help of a community, how can you shed these fucking received formulas. They are received. You didn’t come up with them. And why we need fellow artists is because they help us stay on track. They tell you, “You know what? You’re a bit of a fucking homophobe.” You can’t write about the world with these simplistic distortions. They are cliches. People know art, always, because they are uncomfortable. Art discomforts. The trangressiveness of art has to deal with confronting people with the real. And sexism is a way to avoid the real, avoiding the reality of women. Homophobia is to avoid the real, the reality of queerness. All these things are the way we hide from encountering the real. But art, art is just about that.

"

Junot Diaz speaking at Word Up: Community Bookshop in 2012 (via furthest-city-light)

PREAAAACH!!!!!!!

(Source: hiniascott, via disabledbyculture)

this cracked me up!

(Source: pizza-omelette, via unwinona)

"To me feminism is not simply a struggle to end male chauvinism or a movement to ensure that women will have equal rights with men; it is a commitment to eradicating the ideology of domination that permeates Western culture on various levels—sex, race, and class, to name a few—and a commitment to reorganizing U.S. society so that the self-development of people can take precedence over imperialism, economic expansion, and material desires."

— Patricia Hill Collins, from “Defining Black Feminist Thought” in Black Feminist Thought: Knowledge, Consciousness, and the Politics of Empowerment (via riseabovethemadness)

(Source: continentalbreakfasts, via riseabovethemadness)

cleophatrajones:

LMFAOOOOOOOOOOOOO

cleophatrajones:

LMFAOOOOOOOOOOOOO

(Source: yungwifey, via gorgeous-rainbowcat)